Etymology of Latin words/abbreviations

I often find the academic convention of using Latin words and abbreviations a bit silly.  (Though I’m as guilty as anyone.) Today, I decided to look into a couple common ones, to see if there is any good reason not to use the ordinary English equivalent.

  • “e.g.” is an abbreviation of the Latin “exemplī grātiā”, meaning “for example”.  Here, “exemplī” is not hard to guess and “grātiā” means “for the sake of”.
  • “i.e.” is an abbreviation of the Latin “id est”, meaning “that is”.
  • “via”.  This is not an abbreviation, but was the Latin word for a road.  The plural is “viae”, which you should probably work into your next paper submission.  (I think the usage would be “Linear convergence and entropic sparsity control viae quasi-stochasticity and entropy regulators”?)
  • “et al.”.  Here “et” is Latin for “and” while “al.” is an abreviation for “alii”, meaning “others”.  I seem to recall a major statistics journal maintaining the noble tradition of actually writing “and others”, but can’t recall which one.

I see no particular reason we haven’t adopted English words for all these conventions, but in the context of the many local optima society is in… this hardly seems worth changing.

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